WellBeing by Well.ca | Everything You Need to Know About the PHA, the Skincare Acid for Sensitive Skin
Sensitive skin is defined as having heightened sensory responses to chemical, environmental, or social triggers.
Everything You Need to Know About the PHA, the Skincare Acid for Sensitive Skin
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Skin Care

Everything You Need to Know About the PHA, the Skincare Acid for Sensitive Skin

woman with dark hair putting on face cream in the mirror

Sensitive skin is defined as having heightened sensory responses to chemical, environmental, or social triggers.

Approximately seventy percent of people consider themselves to have sensitive skin.1 If you have sensitive skin, you’re more likely to experience stinging, itching, burning, dryness, redness, or breakouts.

Though the causes of sensitive skin are unclear, studies show that an impaired skin moisture barrier is more susceptible to external aggressors, which can penetrate the skin and induce irritation.2 It’s important to use a skincare regimen that cares for your skin’s moisture barrier with gentle formulations and well-tolerated antiaging ingredients like Polyhydroxy Acids (PHAs).

What are Polyhydroxy Acids (PHAs)?

In addition to the breakthrough discovery of the Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs), the founders of NeoStrata also discovered Polyhydroxy Acids (PHAs) which include Gluconolactone, Lactobionic Acid, and Maltobionic Acid.

PHAs provide exfoliation, high-strength antiaging, and help strengthen the skin’s moisture barrier, with the added benefits of being gentle and non-irritating. They have antioxidant and humectant properties and have been shown not to cause sun sensitivity, making them ideal for any skin type, including sensitive skin.

How Can You Add PHAs to Your Skincare Routine?

womands hands holding neostrata cleanserExcited to try this ingredient for yourself? We recommend starting with the new Neostrata PHA Daily Moisturizer, a lightweight antiaging moisturizer for sensitive skin that gently exfoliates to improve skin texture and radiance while hydrating the skin’s moisture barrier.

For more ways to incorporate PHA’s into your daily regimen, check out the Neostrata PHA regimen below and nourish your skin with these sensitive skin loving PHA formulations!Neostrat cleanser

Step 1: PHA Cleanser

This product is a soap-free, fragrance-free, non-foaming gel cleanser that is gentle and ideal for sensitive and reactive skin. The PHA formulation with Gluconolactone gently exfoliates while effectively removing makeup and impurities without irritation

Step 2: PHA Eye Cream

This hydrating eye-area treatment is fragrance-free, and Ophthalmologist tested. It visibly reduces fine lines and leaves skin soft and supple. It improves skin’s resiliency and contains Gluconolactone, nourishing oils and Hyaluronic Acid.

Step 3: PHA Daily Moisturizer

This moisturizer’s 4% Polyhydroxy Acid (PHA) antiaging formula lightly exfoliates and improves skin texture and radiance. It also contains Antioxidants, including Lilac Plant Cell Extract and Vitamin E, to help protect against the drying and visible aging effects of daily environmental aggressors. This product can be used as both a day cream and a night cream.

Bonus Step – Bionic Oxygen Recovery

This illuminating effervescent facial delivers molecular oxygen and PHAs to help energize and rebalance stressed skin. The fragrance-free and oil-free formulation leaves skin refreshed, and the PHA blend of Gluconolactone and Lactobionic Acid gently exfoliates to enhance skin’s suppleness and radiance.

Are you going to add PHAs to your skincare routine? Tell us below!

 

References

  1. Berardesca, E., Farage, M., and Maibach, H. (2013). Sensitive skin: An overview. Int J Cosmet Sci, 35(1), 2-8.
  2. Kabashima, K., and Egawa, G. (2016). Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march. J Allergy Clin Immunol, 138(2), 350-358.
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Please Keep In Mind

This article is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent diseases. We cannot provide medical advice or specific advice on products related to treatments of a disease or illness. You must consult with your professional health care provider before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, and before taking, varying the dosage of or ceasing to take any medication.

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